Fr Doyle’s 100th anniversary is in 2 days – what will YOU do???

Fr Doyle’s 100th anniversary is in two days time – August 16. It is an excellent time to tell people about his life and his message. I always find that people – even if they have little or no faith or interest in religion – are amazed at his life and his heroism when they first encounter him. Introducing people to the example of Fr Doyle is a useful act of apostolate. 

Perhaps it would be good to take the opportunity of his anniversary to tell people about Fr Doyle? Perhaps his example has enriched your life in some way? There’s no better way to thank him than by telling others about him. 

You could refer people to this site – talk to them, email them, or put a note about it on Facebook or twitter or some other social network. 

Have you told your local priest about Fr Doyle? Or if you are in a prayer group, have you told them?

Have you read any of the books about Fr Doyle? The classic and original O’Rahilly biography, or Carole Hope’s Worshiper and Worshipped, or the Catholic Truth Society booklet by K.V. Turley? This CTS booklet has the great advantage of being relatively cheap to buy – you can buy a bundle and distribute them! Or perhaps my own recent effort To Raise the Fallen? The more people who buy it now, the greater visibility it will have in shops. Links to all of these are available in the right hand column (if you read this on a smart phone the column may not be there, but will be if you read it on a computer).  

Perhaps you might want to send somebody this newsletter on Fr Doyle from St Joseph’s Abbey in Flavigny in France? Flavigny newsletter May 2013

Or maybe you might want to send somebody this short video

Or this one:

I know one priest who reads this site who has preached about Fr Doyle for the last two weekends. Here is a wonderful blog post from one reader of this site on her own blog: https://illuminadomine.com/2017/08/13/holiness-begets-holiness/

Almost all of us can find something to do to make Fr Doyle more well known over these next two days!

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Preparing for Fr Doyle’s 100th anniversary – Day 7: The virtue of temperance

The Catechism of the Catholic Church has the following to say about the virtue of temperance.

1809 Temperanceis the moral virtue that moderates the attraction of pleasures and provides balance in the use of created goods. It ensures the will’s mastery over instincts and keeps desires within the limits of what is honourable. The temperate person directs the sensitive appetites toward what is good and maintains a healthy discretion: “Do not follow your inclination and strength, walking according to the desires of your heart.” Temperance is often praised in the Old Testament: “Do not follow your base desires, but restrain your appetites.” In the New Testament it is called “moderation” or “sobriety.” We ought “to live sober, upright, and godly lives in this world.”

To live well is nothing other than to love God with all one’s heart, with all one’s soul and with all one’s efforts; from this it comes about that love is kept whole and uncorrupted (through temperance). No misfortune can disturb it (and this is fortitude). It obeys only [God] (and this is justice), and is careful in discerning things, so as not to be surprised by deceit or trickery (and this is prudence).

Temperance was certainly one of Fr Doyle’s characteristic virtues. He had a very hearty appetite, but he restrained it, both as a penance and as a form of self-mastery. Circumstances in the war also meant that, like many of the soldiers, he sometimes had to go without food. But on other occasions he also gave his food away to the troops.

Fr Doyle was also a friend and supporter of Fr James Cullen SJ, the founder of the Pioneer Total Abstinence Association. This movement, which is still going strong, was established to help combat excessive alcohol consumption, a real social problem in Ireland, both then and now. Fr Doyle was on the governing council of the Pioneers, and Fr Cullen was even thinking of him as a potential successor as leader of the Pioneers. Fr Doyle was wearing his pioneer pin when he was killed and he is known to have urged men to “take the pledge” to become Pioneers in order to combat the spread of alcoholism in Ireland. 

Fr Doyle was certainly temperate in his use of the bed (he would sometimes sleep on the floor, and even that for only a short amount of time), and temperate in his use of heat, often refusing to a fire in his room. But it is in the matter of food, and the control of his appetite, that he really showed his capacity for the virtue of temperance. We will conclude today with Alfred O’Rahilly’s description of Fr Doyle’s temperance with respect to food. As always, Fr Doyle’s ascetism is, for most of us, more to be admired than imitated…

Moreover, between sugarless tea, butterless bread and saltless meat, he converted his meals into a continuous series of mortifications. Naturally he had, in fact, a very hearty appetite and a keen appreciation of sweets and delicacies; all of which he converted into an arena for self-denial…

We find him pencilling this resolution on the first page of the little private notebook he kept with him at the Front: “No blackberries. Give away all chocolates. Give away box of biscuits. No jam, breakfast, lunch, dinner.”

…Just after giving a retreat in a Carmelite convent, he records: “I felt urged in honour of St. Teresa to give myself absolutely no comfort at meals which I could possibly avoid. I found no difficulty in doing this for the nine days. I have begged very earnestly for the grace to continue this all my life and am determined to try to do so. For example, to take no butter, no sugar in coffee, no salt, etc. The wonderful mortified lives of these holy nuns have made me ashamed of my gratification of my appetite.” That he by no means found this mortification easy we have many indications. Thus on 5th Jan., 1912, he writes: “During Exposition Jesus asked me if I would give up taking second course at dinner. This would be a very great sacrifice; but I promised Him at least to try to do so and begged for grace and generosity.”

“A fierce temptation during Mass and thanksgiving,” he records a year later (18th Sept., 1913), “to break my resolution and indulge my appetite at breakfast. The thought of a breakfast of dry bread and tea without sugar in future seemed intolerable. Jesus urged me to pray for strength though I could scarcely bring myself to do so. But the temptation left me in the refectory, and joy filled my heart with the victory. I see now that I need never yield if only I pray for strength.”

On the subject of butter there are many resolutions in the diary. Materially the subject may seem trivial, but psychologically it represents a great struggle and victory…It is in such little acts that man rises above the beast and fosters his human heritage of a rational will. So Fr. Doyle’s butter-resolutions are not at all so unimportant or whimsical as they who have ever thoughtlessly eaten and drunk may be inclined to fancy. “God has been urging me strongly all during this retreat,” he writes in September 1913, “to give up butter entirely. I have done so at many meals without any serious inconvenience; but I am partly held back through human respect, fearing others may notice it. If they do, what harm? I have noticed that X takes none for lunch; that has helped me. Would not I help others if I did the same?” “One thing,” he continues, “I feel Jesus asks, which I have not the courage to give Him: the promise to give up butter entirely.” On 29th July, 1914, we find this resolution: “For the present I will take butter on two mouthfuls of bread at breakfast but none at other meals.” To this decision he seems to have adhered.

…This relentless concentration of will on matters of food must not lead us to suppose that Fr. Doyle was in any way morbidly absorbed or morosely affected thereby. For one less trained in will or less sure in spiritual perspective there might easily be danger of entanglement in minutiae and over-attention to what is secondary. All this apparatus of mortification is but a means to an end, it should not be made an end in itself…This persistent and systematic thwarting of appetite helped Fr. Doyle to strengthen his will and to fix it on God. He never lost himself in a maze of petty resolutions, he never became anxious or distracted.

14 August 1917: Fr Doyle’s last letter??

Fr Doyle’s last written words

I have told you all my escapes, dearest Father, because I think what I have written will give you the same confidence which I feel, that my old arm chair up in Heaven is not ready yet, and I do not want you to be uneasy about me. I am all the better for these couple of days rest, and am quite on my fighting legs again. Leave will be possible very shortly, I think, so I shall only say au revoir in view of an early meeting. Heaps of love to every dear one. As ever, dearest Father, your loving son, Willie. 14/8/17.

COMMENT: These are probably Fr Doyle’s last written words, written 100 years ago today, just two days before his death. As ever, Fr Doyle was thinking of others, even amongst the mess and strain of the trenches. Could we honestly say that we would have a similar concern for others if we found ourselves in the same situation that Fr Doyle was in?

Today of course, is also the feast of St Maximilian Kolbe, one of the shining examples of holiness and apostolic zeal of the twentieth century. It is interesting that St Maximilian, who was so devoted to Mary, was given the grace of martyrdom on the eve of the feast of the Assumption, while Fr Doyle, who always reported receiving special graces from Mary on this particular feast, received his long desired wish for “martyrdom” immediately after this feast. Their “martyrdoms” are also quite similar. St Maximilian volunteered to take the place of a husband and father who was to be killed in the concentration camp as an act of revenge by the Nazis for the escape of a prisoner. Fr Doyle was blown up while trying to rescue some wounded soldiers. Both St Maximilian and Fr Doyle laid down their lives to save others. This is significant in terms of the changes to the laws on canonisations. I will write more about this in coming days.

Like Fr Doyle in the trenches of World War 1, and St Teresa Benedicta at Auschwitz (who we discussed a few days ago), St Maximilian’s body was entirely destroyed by the Nazis, although there are still some first class relics of St Maximilian due to a barber who cleverly kept some of his hair when it was being cut. 

We shall return to this issue of the destruction of the body of martyrs with some reflections from St Ignatius of Antioch and St Patrick on Wednesday when we remember Fr Doyle’s anniversary. In the meantime, those who want to read more about St Maximilian’s spirituality could fruitfully read some reflections from Fr John Hardon SJ here:

http://www.therealpresence.org/archives/Saints/Saints_002.htm

St Maximilian Kolbe in the concentration camp starvation bunker

Fr Doyle on RTE Radio

Magdalen O’Connell, who I met briefly at the book launch on Thursday, had a short radio essay on Sunday morning about her uncle Donal Galvin, a soldier in the 16th Irish Division, and Fr Doyle. Fr Doyle was killed instantly on 16 August 1917, Magdalen’s uncle was fatally wounded, and died 6 years later from the injuries sustained that day.

The radio essay can be found here: https://rte.ie/r.html?rii=b9_10760106_68_13-08-2017_

It starts approximately 19 minutes into the programme and lasts for approximately 6 minutes. I think you may need to have flash player installed.

I am very grateful to Magdalen for showing me an original letter from Fr Doyle that she had in her possession last Thursday.